Considering a New Career?

The Academy of Radio & Television Broadcasting, the nation’s leading hands-on training facility!

The Academy is a nationally accredited school that provides you with the skills you need for an exciting career in Radio and Television Production. Real world training at the Academy takes months, not years. You are coached one-on-one with working Radio and Television Production professionals, not just instructors. Academy graduates are working as On-Air Personalities, Newscasters, Sports Reporters, Producers, Promotion Directors, Voice-Over Artists, also as on Camera News and Entertainment Reporters, Camera Operators, Video Editors, Commercial Producers and Director
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About the Academy

For over 34 years, the Academy has trained thousands of people just like you who are now working in the broadcasting industry. Academy graduates are working at I-Heart Radio Stations, ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox, CNN,  Univision Television, Infinity Broadcasting, Emmis Broadcasting, Viacom, Entravision, Salem Broadcasting, Clear Channel Radio, ESPN, Universal Studios, BET, WB, Telemundo and at numerous Production and TV stations around the country.

Successful Academy Grads

The Academy graduates are working at some of the biggest and most exciting radio stations in Los Angeles including POWER 106, KLSX, KOST, KNX, KDAY, KROQ, KABC, KFI, KABC, KRTH, The Sound,  KLSX, KYSR, KIIS-FM, KLOS, KXOL, LATINO 96.3, and other highly rated stations in great markets around the country!

unlimited possibilities

Get the skills you NEED. Get in Touch!

Contact The Academy

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Radio

Be ON the Air

If anyone has ever told you that you should be on the radio, or that you have a good voice, or if you have ever thought ‘Hey, I can do that!’ then this is the program for you!

Hands On Training

The Radio Broadcasting Course is a complete, comprehensive training workshop which combines hands-on training and live broadcasting from fully equipped studios.

Broadcast LIVE

More than half of your time is spent in the studios; you’ll be on the air, doing newscasts, and in commercial production utilizing state-of-the-art technology.

Many radio job opportunities

Weekly lectures/workshops include radio programming, commercial production, news, voice-overs, sportscasting, copywriting, music programming, station management, and broadcast sales.

Get that dream job!

In addition, The Academy offers 26 weeks of Vocal Coaching where we teach voice, diction and speaking techniques. As you get ready to graduate, we offer career guidance to help you get the job you want!

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Be sure to check out our Online Radio Training Program HERE

Get behind the Camera. Get in Touch!

Contact The Academy

Television Production

Get behind the scenes

Get behind the scenes

If you ever wanted to work in the Film or Television industry – this course is for you! This exciting course prepares students for positions in front of the camera, as well as in behind the scenes production.

 The Academy of Radio and Television Broadcasting

Learn to shoot on location

The Television/Video Production Course is an extensive hands-on training workshop where students participate in television productions in fully equipped studios and on location shoots.

 The Academy of Radio and Television Broadcasting

Train on industry equipment

You train on professional broadcast cameras, utilize linear and non-linear computers for editing, learn lighting and audio techniques for film and TV. Learn on the equipment used in the real world.

 The Academy of Radio and Television Broadcasting

Direct, Produce or be in Front

You will also direct and produce commercials and shoot different types of shows. The comprehensive course also includes news and script writing, on camera reporting, and on camera talent training.

FINANCIAL AID

Financial Aid The Academy of Radio and Television

Pell Grant

Money given to you by the Federal Government to help you pay for your tuition. Since these are grants, they do not have to be repaid.

Qualifications & Terms

Pell Grants are available for undergradute and vocational students enrolled or accepted in participating schools.

  • The maximum amount is $5920.
  • Must be accepted into current school year to apply.
Learn about other financial aid options  

Pell Grant

Financial Aid given to you by the Federal Government to help you pay for your tuition. Since these are grants, they do not have to be repaid.

Qualifications & Terms

Pell Grants are available for undergradute and vocational students enrolled or accepted in participating schools.

The maximum amount is $5920.
Must be accepted into current school year to apply.

Student Loans

The Stafford Loan is a Federally guaranteed, subsidized student loan. These are long term, low interest loans.

Qualifications & Terms

Every loan offer is based on an individual basis and need.

The Subsidized Stafford  loan has a maximum amount is $3500.
The Unsubsidized Stafford Loan has a maximum of $6,000.00 per academic year.
You make no payments on these loans until you have been out of school for six months.

Parent PLUS Loan

The Federal Parent PLUS Loan helps parents and guardians with good credit borrow up to the cost of attendance for their undergraduate children.

Qualifications & Terms

Parent PLUS Loan funds can be used for tuition, supplies, housing, and more.

The maximum amount is up to the cost of attendance.
Flexible repayment options and deferred payment for financial hardship
0.25% interest rate discount when enrolled in auto-debit

Private Educational Loans

These loans are for students who do not qualify for all or part of the Federal programs. These loans are credit based, and have similar repayment options as the Federal loan programs.

Qualifications & Terms

If you are in a continuing education program to further your education or enhance your career.

Students may need a co-signer to qualify for these loans.
Low interest rates and fees.
Flexible repayment options.

Apply with FASFA

If you would like to complete the FASFA Application online, go to www.fafsa.ed.gov. Use the school code 023424. We will call you with the results, usually 48 hours after you submit the application.

Fill out the FASFA here

Admissions – Tuition

Admissions Qualifications- Tuition

 

Applications for admission to The Academy may be submitted any time by those at least 18 years of age and who have graduated high school or have received their GED or equivalent.

Each eligible person asking about The Academy will be invited to a no cost, no obligation personal interview. During the interview, the visitor gets a complete tour of the facilities and learns important facts about the industry, The Academy, the staff, and careers available. There is time for discussion and a question and answer period. Applicants will be given a voice/talent evaluation to see if they have the potential for a career in broadcasting. Entrance into The Academy is based, in part, on the results of that evaluation. The Academy will make reasonable accommodations for those who have mental or physical disabilities.

If English is not the applicant’s “first” language, the applicant may need to meet the minimum English Language Proficiency standard through submission of an official minimum score on the written Test of English for International Communication TOEIC or its TOEFL Internet-based test (I-BT) equivalent. The minimum score for acceptance to study broadcasting in English is 130 or higher on TOEIC test, for TOEFL, the minimum score for acceptance to study broadcasting in English 480 (Standard), 173 (Computerized), or 61(Internet). All programs are taught in English, and the institute does not offer ESL or other language courses.

Tuition for each program is $15,300.00

Students may apply for Federal financial aid to pay for the programs. Those qualifying for the full Pell grant will have their tuition obligation reduced by approximately 38%

Veterans may apply to use their post 9-11 benefits to pay for the Radio Broadcasting program, Radio Broadcasting Online, and TV Production programs.

The Academy accepts other funding sources including Vocational Rehabilitation, Scholarships, and private financing.

Tuition Payment plans are also available. The Academy accepts all major credit cards.

 

BPPE

 

Bureau of Private Postsecondary Education

 

http://www.bppe.ca.gov/

 

Bureau approval of The Academy of Radio & TV Broadcasting

 

https://app.dca.ca.gov/bppe/view-school.asp?schlcode=3005451

School Catalog

 

 

The Academy of Radio & TV Broadcasting

16052 Beach Blvd, Suite 263

Huntington Beach, CA  92647

Office:  (714) 842-0100

Fax:  (714) 842-1858

 

www.arbradio.com

January 1, 2017-December 31, 2017

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Table of Contents

Welcome. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Mission Statement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Our Facilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Approvals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Ownership and Control. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Licensed By. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Admission. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Notice of Nondiscrimination. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Credit for Previous Training or Experience. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Radio Broadcasting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Course Description, Program Outline, Grading System, Graduation Requirements

4
Television/Video Production & Broadcasting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Course Description, Program Outline, Grading System, Graduation Requirements

8
Attendance Policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Make Up Work. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Career Development. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Course and Schedule Changes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Schedule and Holidays. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Satisfactory Progress Standard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Financial Aid & Academic Warning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Maximum Time Frame. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Leave of Absence. . . . . . . . . . . . .  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Housing Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Student Records. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Rules of Conduct. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Copyright Infringement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Drugs and Alcohol. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Problems, Concerns, Complaints. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Termination of Enrollment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Financial Assistance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Buyer’s Right to Cancel and Refund Policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Return of Title IV Funds Policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Staff Biographies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Tuition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Staff. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Campus Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

revised 03/17

School Catalog

 

Welcome __________________________________________

The Academy of Radio & TV Broadcasting is your pathway into an exciting, glamorous and rewarding career in the entertainment industry. The Academy offers you hands-on training, using fully equipped studios, state of the art digital technology, and a staff of working industry professionals intent on your success.

 

The Academy has been training those with a desire to work in the broadcasting and entertainment industry since 1983. The Academy’s philosophy is that competent education provided in a real-life atmosphere and presented by professionals in their field prepares Graduates for a large number of beginning career positions in the industry.

 

To validate our training and institution, The Academy sought independent review of its operation and organization in 1986.Having a proven track record of training and high placement, the Academy requested the Accrediting Council for Continuing Education and Training (ACCET), a nationally recognized accrediting body, to thoroughly examine the institution.  An intensive on site evaluation took place, and ACCET found that The Academy met its stringent standards in all aspects of the operation, including the educational program, training methodology, placement program, management, school operations and ethics. The Academy continually strives to exceed the standards of accreditation, and receives on-going feedback from students, employers and others in the industry to keep our training current with the entertainment industry and current technological trends.

Mission Statement ________________________________

The mission of The Academy of Radio & T.V. Broadcasting is to provide those with a sincere desire for careers in Radio and Television/Video Production with their best opportunity for entry-level positions in the Industry. The Academy accomplishes our mission by screening applicants for talent and desire, and providing complete, comprehensive training in a hands-on environment, coaching by working professionals, and mentoring on an individual basis.

Our Facilities ______________________________________

To fulfill the career and training objectives of its students, the Academy’s facility consists of almost 7000, climate controlled, square feet with 18 fully equipped broadcast studios, television set and editing facilities, special facilities for on camera training, two large lecture rooms, news gathering and editing area, Personal Instruction rooms, a student lounge, and administrative areas. The complex offers ample parking, easy access to public transportation, and complies with handicap requirements.

All information in the content of this school catalog is current, correct and is so certified as true in content and policy by T. Gillenwater, President.

Approvals__________________________________________

The Academy of Radio & TV Broadcasting, 16052 Beach Blvd., Suite 263, Huntington Beach, CA 92647, was granted institutional approval from the Bureau for Private Postsecondary and Vocational Education  (www.bppe.ca.gov) pursuant to California Education Code Section 94915. The Council’s approval means that the institution and its operation comply with the standards established under the law for occupational instruction by private postsecondary educational institutions. The Academy of Radio & TV Broadcasting is a private institute.

 

 

 

Approved are the courses:

RADIO BROADCASTING

(36 Quarter Credits)

 

TELEVISION/VIDEO PRODUCTION AND BROADCASTING

(36 Quarter Credits)

 

Instruction is in residence with facility occupancy level accommodating 190 students at any one time.

 

California statute requires that a student who successfully completes a course of study, be awarded an appropriate diploma or certificate verifying the fact. The Academy of Radio Broadcasting awards Diplomas to its Graduates.

 

Prospective enrollees are encouraged to visit the physical facilities of the school and to discuss personal educational and occupational plans with school personnel prior to enrolling or signing enrollment agreements.

 

This school currently does have available sponsored programs, government or otherwise, to provide grants or to pay for portions of tuition and fees. These programs include the PELL Grants, Stafford Loans, and PLUS Loans.  Please see The Academy’s Financial Aid Director for details, applications, and any assistance you may need.

Ownership and Control______________________________________

The Academy of Radio & TV Broadcasting is under the ownership and control of The Academy of Radio Broadcasting, Inc., a California Corporation. Shareholders are Thomas Gillenwater (50%) and Linda Thurrell (50%).

Licensed By_________________________________________________

 

The Academy of Radio Broadcasting, 16052 Beach Blvd., Suite 263, Huntington Beach, CA 92647 has been approved to operate by The Bureau for Private Postsecondary and Vocational Education (www.bppe.ca.gov) under the California Education Code Section 94915. Approval to operate means that The Academy is in compliance with the minimum state standards and does not imply any endorsement or recommendation by the state or by The Bureau.

The educational program offered by The Academy is validated by the Accrediting Commission of the Accrediting Council for Continuing Education and Training (ACCET), a national accrediting agency listed with the U.S. Department of Education.

Admission to The Academy _______________________

Applications for admission to The Academy may be submitted any time by those at least 18 years of age and who have graduated high school or have received their GED or equivalent.

Each eligible person asking about The Academy will be invited to a no cost, no obligation personal interview. During the interview, the visitor gets a complete tour of the facilities and learns important facts about the industry, The Academy, the staff, and careers available. There is time for discussion and a question and answer period. Applicants will be given a voice/talent evaluation to see if they have the potential for a career in broadcasting. Entrance into The Academy is based, in part, on the results of that evaluation. The Academy will make reasonable accommodations for those who have mental or physical disabilities.

As a prospective student, you are encouraged to review this catalog prior to signing an enrollment agreement. You are also encouraged to review the School Performance Fact Sheet, which must be provided to you prior to signing an enrollment agreement. If English is not the applicant’s “first” language, the applicant may need to meet the minimum English Language Proficiency standard through submission of an official minimum score on the written Test of English for International Communication TOEIC or its TOEFL Internet-based test (I-BT) equivalent. The minimum score for acceptance to study broadcasting in English is 130 or higher on TOEIC test, for TOEFL, the minimum score for acceptance to study broadcasting in English 480 (Standard), 173 (Computerized), or 61(Internet). All programs are taught in English, and the institute does not offer ESL or other language courses.

Notice of Nondiscrimination_______________________

The Academy does not discriminate in admission, access, treatment, or employment based on race, sex, ethnic origin, disability, or religion in its programs, activities, student or staff matters. The Academy is obligated to provide program accessibility for disabled persons and has designated a contact person to handle any problems: Thomas Gillenwater, President, 16052 Beach Blvd., Suite 263, Huntington Beach, CA 92647, (714) 842-0100. Unresolved complaints may be directed to the Office for Civil Rights at Old Federal Building, 50 United Nations Plaza, Room 209, San Francisco, CA 94102 or call (415) 556-7000.

Credit for Previous Training or Experience________

Individuals who have received previous training in Radio Broadcasting or TV/Video Production may request credit for a portion of their training. The Academy may accept transfer credits if the following criteria are met:  This request must be made in writing, upon enrollment. Students must have maintained a minimum 3.0 GPA, credits must reflect closely the program content for which the student is requesting credit, and the submission of certified transcripts of credits earned and hours completed. Documentation will be reviewed for the granting of credit. The Academy will accept no more than 10% of the course credits requested. However, only time credit will be granted at the sole discretion of The Academy. There is no granting of financial credit. Students should be aware that accepting transfer credits from another institution will negatively affect the students’ eligibility for full funding if applying for Federal Financial Aid. Transfer of credit denials may be appealed to the School Director. Students wanting to transfer credits to another institution will be given an official transcript, course outline and syllabi, however, students should check with the institute to see if Academy credits are transferable. The Academy does not award credit for prior experiential learning. There is no appeal process for this.

 

NOTICE CONCERNING TRANSFERABILITY OF CREDITS AND CREDENTIALS EARNED AT

OUR INSTITUTION

The transferability of credits you earn at The Academy is at the complete discretion of an institution to which you may seek to transfer. Acceptance of the certificate you earn in Radio Broadcasting or TV/Video Production is also at the complete discretion of the institution to which you may seek to transfer. If the credits or certificate that you earn at this institution are not accepted at the institution to which you seek to transfer, you may be required to repeat some or all of your coursework at that institution. For this reason you should make certain that your attendance at this institution will meet your educational goals. This may include contacting an institution to which you may seek to transfer after attending The Academy to determine if your credits or certificate will transfer.

 

Radio Broadcasting_________________________

 

The Radio Broadcasting Program is a comprehensive training program that consists of 36 Quarter Credits (900 hours) of studio time and instruction over a 30-week period. The education combines hands-on, live broadcasting from fully equipped studios with practical and theoretical information, production, Vocal Coaching, Personal Instruction, and Career Guidance. The Courses provide complete skills training allowing graduates access to entry-level career positions in the broadcast industry as Air Personalities, Newscasters, Sportscasters, Commercial Producers, and as well as other stimulating opportunities, including self-employment on their own Internet radio station, and voice over and commercial production via the Internet.

 

The Academy will coordinate with students, as space and practicality permit, the best times for them to attend. This open structure allows Students to attend to their personal responsibilities while pursuing their career goals.

 

The Instructor to Student ratio for studio work is 1 to 1, as needed, and, for Personal Instruction, 1 to 3.  Lectures are presented to groups and the number of students scheduled for a particular period determines the ratio. Vocal Coaching sessions consist of one Instructor and about 15 students.

 

The Program is structured in terms of Quarter Credits for easy interpretation by other institutes. The conversion ratio: every 20 hours of scheduled training is 1 Quarter Credit for Academic and Financial Aid purposes.

Course Description-Radio Broadcasting_______________________________

Course Overview

Students are expected to attend scheduled studio time, Vocal Coaching, Lecture, and Personal Instruction sessions every week for 26 weeks. Weeks 27-30 will have a slightly different schedule. The earning of Quarter Credits will be evaluated and awarded in weekly PI sessions, concurrent with completed assignments.

 

Depending on when you begin the cycle, the order of the lectures may change.

 

Orientation (1st week) The student is made aware of the nature and scope of the broadcast industry, The Academy, and their roles in each. Shift schedules are prepared and the Student is given a practical demonstration in the use of the mixing board and related equipment.

 

In Studio (1—30 weeks) Students prepare and execute 180 hours/shifts of each Air Shows, Newscasting, and Production. Preparation varies by duty and assignment and consists of writing commercials or parodies, selecting and organizing music to be aired, gathering and writing news stories, developing unique “air personalities,” and other measures relative to the objectives.

 

Vocal Coaching (26 weeks) Students learn the techniques of proper speech, enunciation, diction, and articulation. Standard American English is taught and practiced.

 

Personal Instruction (26 weeks) Each week, students have their work and skills development critiqued by long-term, industry professionals. Focus is placed on the development of a marketable personality, creativity, and quality performance.

 

Outside Research and Assignments (30 weeks) 180 total outside hours

 

Copywriting (1 week) Students learn basic, efficient, and imaginative composition to write commercials for radio use.

 

FCC Rules and Regulations (1 week) Students receive an overview of federal laws and basic engineering surrounding the operation of radio stations.

 

Traffic and Continuity (1 week) Students learn how to schedule and place commercials, PSAs, and other spots while setting up a program log.

 

News (3 weeks) The skills to gather, assemble, organize, and report the news ethically and credibly are taught.

 

Music Directing (1 week) The concepts of music programming, formats, research, and establishing a music library are learned.

 

Sportscasting (1 week) Students learn to gather, organize, and deliver sports reports.

 

Station Management (1 week) Assembling a professional staff, budget considerations, and advertising are the main issues explored by students.

 

Station Promotion (1 week) Emphasis is placed on public relations, publicity, and advertising the station through various means.

 

Ratings and Research (1 week) This covers ratings and how they are measured, and their impact on programming. Students also learn what kinds of research radio stations conduct to evaluate and fine-tune programming.

 

Your Own Business (1 week) The basics of setting up a home-based business in the field of broadcasting (producing, voice overs, operating your own Internet radio station) is covered.

 

Broadcast Syndication (1 week) Students study the nature and structure of program outlets, station relationships, and resources.

 

Broadcast Sales (1 week) The unique nature and approach to selling commercial time is explored.

 

Production (2 weeks) Fundamentals to creative arts of dubbing, use and maintenance of equipment, editing, and developing commercials for radio are taught.

 

Commercial Interpretation (1 week) Students learn to express feelings and communicate ideas through verbal dramatizations.

 

Personality Radio (1 week) The development of an individual identity through the use of humor and other means with a focus on legal boundaries is taught.

 

Programming (3 weeks) The need to establish a station’s identity in the competitive radio market with a focus on ratings is explored. Students learn to establish a format, direct its implementation, and determine workable alternatives.

 

Voice Overs (1 week) Students explore this as a business option through interpretive readings, expression of attitudes, and employment acquisition methods.

 

Introduction to TV (1 week) This section teaches students the similarities and differences between the radio and television industries and radio as an entrance into TV.

 

Interviewing Techniques (1 week) The skills needed to be effective in talk radio and radio journalism are taught to students.

 

Your First Job (1 week) The focus is on making an “Audition Demo” used to secure employment positions. Students develop a resume suitable to the broadcast industry. They learn how and where to apply for positions, the types of positions available, and the interviewing skills needed to capture employment opportunities.

 

Final Examination (1 week) This is an objectively scored, written examination testing what the student has learned throughout the Program.

 

Career Guidance (4 weeks) Students prepare audition demos for their job search. Resumes and cover letters are prepared. Job leads and station specifics are provided. Staff reviews students’ progress individually and in group sessions.

Program Outline-Radio Broadcasting______________________________________

 

Module

Lecture

Hours

Lab

Hours

Total Clock Hours Quarter Credits Outside Work Total Hours
Music Directing 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Copywriting 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Commercial Interpretation 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
FCC Rules & Regulations 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Competitive Programming 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Interviewing & Talk Radio 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Production and Sound 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Traffic & Continuity 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Voice Overs 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
News Reporting 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Program Directing 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Station Management 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Personality Radio 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Sportscasting 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Introduction to TV 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Station Promotions 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Multitrack/Digital Production 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Broadcast Syndication 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
News Development 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Broadcast Sales 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Alternative Programming 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Your Own Business 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Ratings & Research 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
News Journalism 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
First Job 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Final Exam 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Final Project/Career Work (4 weeks) 24 72 96 4.8 24 120
Totals: 180

Lecture hours

540

Lab hours

720

Total Clock Hours

36

Quarter Credits

180

Outside Work

900

Total Hours

Grading System-Radio Broadcasting___________________________________

The Academy uses a 1 to 4 point system to grade the results of student’s completed assignment. Grades are based upon broadcast industry standards compared to the Student’s work. Points accrue toward a final grade and Graduation Requirements by adding together the points received for each completed assignment.

 

4-above or exceeds broadcast standards: airable, exceeded objectives

3-meets broadcast standards: airable, met basic objectives

2-does not meet broadcast standards: defective and not airable as is, below basic objectives

1-unacceptable: wholly unairable, substantially short of objectives

 

There are 15 assignments and the Vocal Coaching Final worth up to 4 points each for a maximum of 64 points (16 x 4 = 64). There are 26 Outside Research assignments that are worth 1 point each for a maximum of 26 points. There is one assignment (Programming #2) that contains four, five-point elements and is worth a maximum of 20 points. The written, final examination is scored objectively, and is worth a total of 100 points.

 

Outside Research, Studio Prep and Assignments are due on a weekly basis. The work is evaluated by the Personal Instructors and Career Counselor and points are awarded upon the completion of the work.

 

The points acquired from the above will be weighted with the Student’s Audition Demo to determine a Final Grade. Each Student must prepare an Audition Demo before being graduated. The Demo is worth a maximum of 100 points and is scored relative to the Student’s demonstrated abilities, following the given format, and its potential for promoting the Student’s employment objectives.

 

The Final Grade is determined by a percentage of points achieved, with the maximum being 310 (100%), converted to a letter grade.  The scale is: 90-100%=A; 80-89.9%=B; 70-79.9%=C; 60-69.9%=D; below 60% is a failure.

Graduation Requirements-Radio Broadcasting________________________

The Requirements for Graduation are:

  • Having submitted an acceptable Audition Demo,
  • Having attended at least 80% of the scheduled hours,
  • Having attained at least a C Final Grade, and
  • Having met or complied with all financial obligations relating to The Academy including any student loan obligations.

Students successful in meeting these Requirements will receive a Diploma.

Television/Video Production & Broadcasting

The Television/Video Production and Broadcasting Course is a comprehensive training program combining hands-on, actual television and video production and broadcasting from fully equipped studios with practical and theoretical information and personal instruction. The Course provides complete skills training and allows Graduates access to entry-level career positions (requiring knowledge of the industry and various facets of the business) in the television and video industry as camera operators, editing technicians, lighting operators, on-camera personalities, and many others, including hosting your own Television Station on the Internet, and producing and distributing video content.

 

The Course consists of 36 Quarter Credits and 900 Hours of instruction and studio time (lab) over a 30-week period. Student schedules are set during normal business and teaching hours and students spend 24 hours per week on campus and 6 hours a week on Outside Work. The Course is structured in terms of Quarter Credits for easy interpretation by other institutes. The conversion ratio: every 20 hours of scheduled training is 1 Quarter Credit for Academic and Financial Aid purposes. The earning of Quarter Credits will be evaluated and awarded based on weekly classroom sessions concurrent with completed assignments.

 

 

The Instructor to Student ratio for studio (lab) work has an average of 1 to 12. Lectures are presented to groups and the number of Students scheduled for a particular period determines the ratio.

Course Description-Television/Video Production & Broadcasting___

Orientation (1st week) Students receive an introduction to basic TV and Video equipment.

 

Camera Operation (4 weeks) Students will be taught the operation of increasingly complex camera equipment along with the technical aspect of their operation. In addition, they will learn the manipulation and design of various camera support systems, such as dollies, tripods and body-mounted devices.

 

Audio Operation (2 weeks) Students will be instructed in basic sound technology along with hands-on training in both basic and sophisticated audio board techniques. Technological microphone differences and sound structuring in both field and studio situations will also be taught.

 

Lighting Operation (2 weeks) Students will receive in-depth, hands-on instruction in lighting techniques for film and video in both indoor and outdoor situations as well as for still and moving subjects.

 

Talent, Announcing & Dramatic (2 weeks) Students will be instructed in techniques for effective communication on television in both stand-up and dramatic (commercial) situations. Also taught are an awareness of visual and vocal presentation and the use of Teleprompters versus script memorization.

 

Commercial Copywriting (1 week) Writing basics, viewer motivation techniques, basic buyer appeals, appealing to the five senses, source information, legal information, A.I.D.A. formula, writing types, organizing information and getting ideas will be taught.

 

Graphics (2 weeks) Students will learn to use character generators to reinforce the visual messages on the screen. The Student will also be taught picture composition to provide the proper balance of graphic to non-graphic material and color coordination of graphic material for an aesthetic visual image.

 

News Journalism (1 week) This covers writing for broadcast news. Style, technique, sources, proper attribution, tips from the pros, rewriting, the reporter and the law (libel, trespass, invasion of privacy and apparent authority), using hidden cameras and microphones and protecting your sources are covered. Students will receive extensive training in on-camera news operations, including anchor, sports, weather and field reporter situations.

 

Control Room Operation & Switching (2 weeks) This is an in-depth analysis of control room operations and personnel. Included are switching techniques, director terminology and reading of monitors.

 

 

Producing, Directing, Business & Sales (3 weeks) Duties and responsibilities of a producer and director in broadcast and Internet production arenas are presented. Areas covered include: budgeting, production planning, equipment scheduling, personnel, staff organization of stations and basic sales.

 

 

Editing (4 weeks) Covering the basics of editing and equipment operation, emphasis is placed on editing 30 and 60 second commercials, news, and industrial footage. This includes transition methods, types of edit systems, control track and time code editing, plus an understanding of linear and non-linear editing. There is a review of methods on enhancing your production by proper use of footage to advance the action, pacing, matching action through parallel cutting, flash edits, wipes, dissolves and proper placement of graphics.

 

Set Design (1 week) This is an in-depth look at the aesthetics of television. How to construct a set and how shots should be composed in a number of realistic situations for news, commercials and institutional videos are covered.

 

Script Formats (1 week) The preparation of scripts for industrial video situations is explored.  This includes gathering of information, planning techniques, layout, storyboards, characterization, drama, suspense, visual considerations and doing treatments for presentation.

 

Final Project (4 weeks) Students prepare several projects for their demo, including a commercial, a news magazine story (3-5 mins), and a 2 min video that tells a story using video and music.

 

Personal Instruction (1—30 weeks) Each week, Students have their work and skills development critiqued by long-term, industry professionals. Focus is placed on the development of a marketable personality, creativity, and quality performance.

 

Studio Time (1—30 weeks) Students practice and improve their skills through the use of real equipment in actual broadcast and video studios. Staff reviews students’ progress individually and in group sessions.

 

Outside Research and Assignments (30 weeks) Students are required to complete weekly assignments which include critiquing TV shows for editing, lighting, sound, and camera technique. Assignments will differ from week to week.  Students also complete workbook assignments correlating to the weekly module and textbook chapter. These assignments will be reviewed at the end of the week

Career Guidance (4 weeks) Resumes and cover letters are prepared. Students are taught how to develop contacts, how to interview, and how to freelance using the Internet.

 

Program Outline-Television/Video Production & Broadcasting________

 

 

 

Module

Lecture

Hours

Lab

Hours

Total Clock

Hours

Quarter

Credits

Outside

Work

Total Hours
Orientation 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Understanding Editing 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Dramatic Editing 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Set Design 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Script Formats 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Video Effects 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Graphics 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
News Journalism 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Hands on Camera 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Camera Operation & Frame 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Producer Training 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Directing & Communicating 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Studio Talent 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Field Production 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Video Recording 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Compelling Video 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Studio Switching & Live Editing 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Studio Audio 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Field Audio 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Understanding the Camera 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Understanding the Lens 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Lighting Equipment 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Lighting Techniques 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
News Reporting 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Production Team 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Commercial Copywriting 6 18 24 1.2 6 30
Final Projects/Career Work (4 weeks) 24 72 96 4.8 24 120
Totals: 180 Lecture Hours 540 Lab Hours 720

Total Clock Hours

36 Quarter Credits 180 Outside Work 900

Total Hours

Grading System- Television/Video Production & Broadcasting________

Assignments and Studio Prep are due on a weekly basis. The work is evaluated by the Instructors and Career Counselor and points are awarded upon the completion of the work.

 

There are 26 tests worth up to 5 points each for a maximum of 130 points (26 x 5=130). There are 26 Assignments that are worth 1 point each for a maximum of 26 points. The written Final Examination is scored objectively and is worth a total of 100 points. These points will be weighted equally with the Student’s combined total of the three final projects to determine a final grade.

 

Each Student must complete all three final projects before graduating.  The maximum combined point total of the Final Projects is 120. A 5-point system is used to grade the projects, based upon industry standards compared to the Student’s work.

 

5-excellent work: exceeds broadcast standards

4-above broadcast standards: airable, exceeded objectives

3-meets broadcast standards: airable, met basic objectives

2-does not meet broadcast standards: defective and not airable as is, below basic objectives

1-unacceptable: wholly unairable, substantially short of objectives

 

The Final Grade is determined by a percentage of points achieved, with the maximum being 376 (100%), converted to a letter grade.  The scale is: 90-100%=A; 80-89.9%=B; 70-79.9%=C; 60-69.9%=D; below 60% is a failure.

Graduation Requirements-Television/Video Production & Broadcasting________________________________________________________ ____

The Requirements for Graduation are:

 

  • Having submitted an acceptable Demo Reel,
  • Having attended at least 80% of the scheduled hours,
  • Having attained at least a C Final Grade, and
  • Having met or complied with all financial obligations relating to The Academy including any student loan obligations.

 

Students successful in meeting these Requirements will receive a Diploma.

 

Academy Attendance Policies_____________________

You can’t learn, produce, or further your career by not coming to school. Your future employer will not tolerate anything less than a prompt, dependable person and neither would you.

 

Students are to attend all sessions as scheduled. Students are to be on time and prepared for any Studio Shift, Personal Instruction period, or other activity. There is no provision for tardiness and those who arrive late or leave early for any scheduled activity will not receive time credit for that activity. Students who are unable to attend a scheduled session are to notify The Academy at least one hour in advance.

 

Formal Warnings may be issued to Students whose attendance falls below 80% of their scheduled time in any subject or area during any week or period. Any student who is absent for two consecutive weeks (14 calendar days) may have their enrollment terminated automatically.

 

Formal Warnings will be issued to Students receiving G.I. Bill benefits whose Attendance falls below 70% of their scheduled time in any subject or area during any week or period.  If the attendance is not at or above 70% within 30 days of the Formal Warning, the student will be terminated immediately.

Make Up Work_____________________________________

It is the Student’s responsibility to follow their schedule, attend all Lectures, Vocal Coaching sessions, Personal Instruction sessions, Studio shifts, and complete all assignments. Studio time, Personal Instruction and work not completed as scheduled, due to absence or other causes, may be made up at the discretion of the Director or Instructor. Vocal Coaching and Lecture, if missed during a particular week, cannot be made up. A Student wishing to make up missed assignments, shifts or tests should contact the Chief Instructor or Administrator. Assignments, tests and projects that are late may have points deducted or a zero may be given. The Academy does not have a physical library per se, however trade magazines and resource publications are available in the lobby. Links to internet resources are available from the lead instructor.

Career Development_______________________________

Career Development is available to all Graduates for as long as they may desire. It is, however, the responsibility of the Graduate to seek assistance and actively participate in the process. Students may be considered waived or ineligible and miss employment opportunities if they do not comply with the ongoing guidance provided, default on their financial obligations to The Academy or on their student loans, or have completed the course but not met graduation requirements for either lack of attendance or assignments.

 

The Academy will assist students in the development of a resume, cover letter and demo, will teach effective interviewing techniques and show students where to find job leads. The Academy does not guarantee the employment of its Graduates. No reputable school can. However, each member of The Academy’s staff has a sincere desire to see that each Graduate fulfills his or her career objectives and will help as much as possible.

Course and Schedule Changes_____________________

The Academy reserves the right to modify or change Course content or sequence, to modify staff assignments, and change equipment to remain current with industry trends and effective teaching. Exercising these rights will not cause cost increases to students or diminish the competency or content of the Program.

Schedule and Holidays_____________________________

The Radio Broadcasting Program is 900 hours in length constituting 36 Quarter Credits and is taught over 30 weeks. The Television/Video is 900 hours, 36 Quarter Credits and 30 weeks in duration. Because of the nature and structure of the Programs, students may begin their career training without regard to traditional terms or semesters. For specific start dates, the Admissions Office should be contacted. To find a typical Projected Graduation Date, just add 30 weeks to the Start Date. For example:

Start:         01/26/15 or 03/18/15                        Graduate:  08/24/15 or 10/14/15

 

The Academy is open for instruction and student activities from 8AM to 10PM, Monday through Friday, and on Saturday and Sunday as needed. A Student’s schedule will be set during normal operating hours. Students devote 24 hours per week to course related activities. The Academy closes for national holidays: New Year’s Day, Easter, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day.

Satisfactory Progress Standard___________________

Students must maintain meaningful progress toward Graduation Requirements. To monitor this and advise Students of their advancement, The Academy issues Progress Reports approximately every five weeks.

 

Federal regulations require that all schools participating in Title IV federal student aid programs establish academic standards that measure a student’s progress towards an educational goal. The Academy of Radio & TV Broadcasting has established requirements that students must meet in order to remain eligible to receive federal and state financial aid. Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) is reviewed at the end of each payment period and determined to be satisfactory or unsatisfactory according to this policy.

Each student’s SAP will be monitored and measured by:

  • The maximum time frame in which the educational program must be completed.
  • An evaluation of grades (Cumulative G.P.A.) and percentage of quarter credits completed.

 

The purpose of financial aid is to help each student with the financial resources needed to successfully achieve their academic goal. As a financial aid recipient, it is the student’s responsibility to understand and meet the terms and conditions of the SAP Policy. Students receiving funds must be enrolled in an eligible program of study to be considered a regular student.

 

Grade Point Average Requirement: Students are required to maintain a cumulative 60% GPA at the mid point of their program, after their first payment period.

 

Successful Completion: To be considered to be making satisfactory academic progress and therefore remain eligible for financial aid, students must show a cumulative successful completion rate of 60% GPA and completion of 18 quarter credits when their SAP is reviewed. Be sure to note that all credits attempted, regardless of the grade or score given for the course, will be counted toward the maximum time frame limit.

Financial Aid Warning______________________________

Upon review, if a student’s cumulative GPA is less than 60% and/or the percentage of quarter credit completion is less than 18, the student will be placed on Financial Aid Warning status.  Students are eligible to receive financial aid for one payment period. Once a student has raised their cumulative GPA back to 60% or higher and successfully completed at least 70% of all hours, they will be removed from Financial Aid Warning.

Academic Warning_________________________________

Non Title IV students not meeting Satisfactory Progress Standards at the midpoint of the normal duration of the Course (15 weeks) will be placed on Academic warning for the next pay period or until Satisfactory Progress is achieved during that time.

 

A student on Academic Warning status is considered to be making satisfactory academic progress. Warning status lasts for one payment period. There is no appeal process for being placed in an Academic Warning status.

Students receiving G.I. Bill benefits on Academic Warning will be terminated immediately.

Maximum Time Frame_____________________________

Students enrolled in an eligible Certificate program will be allowed to attempt up to 150% of the published number of quarter credits required to earn the certificate. If the student has reached their academic goal, they are considered to be finished. However all attempted units that count toward the maximum time frame and the student may not attempt more than 36 quarter credits for all coursework. Students who reach the maximum time frame for their program will no longer receive financial aid.

Leave of Absence__________________________________

A Student may request a Leave of Absence for documented, exceptional medical or personal (death in family, etc.) situations. The time may not exceed 105 days and be no less than two weeks.  Multiple leaves may be permitted provided the total leave does not exceed this limit.

If a student does not request a leave of absence within a timeframe consistent with the institution’s consecutive absence policy, he or she must be withdrawn.

The written request for a Leave of Absence must be submitted to the Chief Instructor or Administrator in advance of the leave, unless unforeseen circumstances prevent the student from doing so. The student must sign and date the leave of absence request and specify a reason for the leave. The reason must be specified in order for the institution to have a reasonable expectation of the student’s return within the timeframe of the leave of absence as requested. The student must attest to understanding the procedures and implications for returning or failing to return to his/her course of study.

The Chief Instructor or Administrator will promptly notify the Student whether the request has been granted or denied. A denied request may be appealed to the Administrator of The Academy.

An approved leave of absence may be extended for an additional period of time provided that the extension request meets all of the above requirements, and the total length of the leave of absence does not exceed the specified limit.

 

Because of the linear nature of the Television /Video Production, Leaves of Absence cannot be granted

Housing Information

The Academy does not provide housing, and does not have a dormitory. Home-stay and apartments are available in the area around the campus; costs vary from $800 for a home stay to $1000-$1400 per month for an apartment. The Academy has no responsibility to find or assist a student in finding housing.

Student Records___________________________________

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act lets all students review their academic records, including grades, attendance, and counseling. Students’ records are confidential and only the agencies or individuals authorized by law are allowed access without written permission. Students may review their records by written request to the Director who will schedule a time for that purpose.

The Academy keeps student files for five years from students’ last dates of attendance. Beyond that, they may be purged and become unavailable. Academic transcripts are kept indefinitely.

Rules of Conduct___________________________________

Students should act in an adult, safe, and courteous manner. Those disrespectful of the rights of others or their property are subject to Probation and/or Termination of Enrollment.

 

Unacceptable acts and conduct include the use or being under the influence of any intoxicant while on school grounds, the possession of any illegal substance while on school property, possession of a weapon while on school property, theft, vandalism, lewdness, acts endangering the health and safety of others, abusive or disrespectful behavior, foul language, and any other act contrary to the intent of this policy. Students will be held accountable for their actions. Grounds and property include the sites of school functions.

 

Damage to equipment or facilities, beyond normal wear and use, will be charged to the Student causing the damage and must be paid prior to graduating.

Copyright Infringement________________________________

Commercial software programs are licensed to and property of ARB. Software applications, in-house software and programs, software systems designs, and programs/applications written specifically for the Academy by employees and others, are the property of the Academy. It is a violation of company policy to distribute or allow unauthorized use of such programs. Violation of this policy may result in student’s facing civil or criminal liability and penalties for unauthorized use and distribution of materials.

Drugs and Alcohol__________________________________

The Academy is deeply concerned about the health and safety risks associated with drug and alcohol abuse. Enrolling Students receive informational literature to increase their awareness of these risks.  Students are informed of the legal sanctions covering the use, possession, and distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol.

 

Students are encouraged to read and discuss the information provided. If they feel that assistance or counseling would be of benefit, The Academy will refer them to groups and facilities for help. Students who show the need for treatment will be referred in their best interests.

Problems, Concerns, Complaints__________________

Whenever there is a gathering of creative, dedicated people, differences of opinion may surface.  The Academy has established a common sense procedure to resolve discords.

A Student should first attempt to settle their differences with the disagreeing other. Failing that, they may approach the Chief Instructor and, if unresolved, the on-site Administrator (President, 16052 Beach Blvd., Ste. 263, Huntington Beach, CA 92647, (714) 842-0100). Written complaints will be accepted and investigated, and the complainant will be advised in writing of the findings within 20 days. The complainant has the right to appeal the determination and such appeal should be directed to Thomas Gillenwater, President, at the main campus, who will respond to the appeal with his findings and decision within 30 days. Any questions a student may have regarding this catalog that have not been satisfactorily answered by the institution may be directed to the Bureau for Private

Postsecondary Education at 2535 Capitol Oaks Drive, Suite 400, Sacramento, CA 95833 or P.O. Box 980818, West Sacramento, CA 957980818, www.bppe.ca.gov, (888) 3707589 or by fax (916) 2631897 A student or any member of the public may file a complaint about this institution with the Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education by calling (888) 3707589 or by completing a complaint form, which can be obtained on the bureau’s internet web site (www.bppe.ca.gov). If still unresolved, written complaints, supporting correspondence and documentation may be sent to ACCET, 1722 N St. N.W., Washington D.C. 20036 (202) 955-1113. Complaints may be submitted directly to ACCET if the school is unable to successfully resolve the problem. The institution does not have a pending petition in bankruptcy, is not operating as a debtor in possession, has not filed a petition within the preceding five years, or has had a petition in bankruptcy filed against it within the preceding five years that resulted in reorganization under Chapter 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code (11 U.S.C. Sec 1101 et seq.)

 

Termination of Enrollment_________________________

The Academy may dismiss any Student who violates the Rules of Conduct, falsifies documents, or fails to fulfill their financial obligations. Also, Students who incur two consecutive weeks’ absence or fail to return from a Leave Of Absence as scheduled will be dismissed automatically. A student has 5 days in which to appeal termination.

Students who were dismissed may apply for readmission no less than 30 days after their termination date.

Applicants rejected by the institution will lose the registration fee after the three day period, if the student does not show for class, doesn’t start the program, is in default on a student loan and is using Federal funds to pay tuition, or merely changes their mind on attending. Students will be refunded any monies paid, minus the registration fee should the institute cancel a program for which the student is enrolled. Enrollees have the right to cancel their enrollment and receive a refund of any charges paid, through attendance at the first class session, or the seventh day after enrollment, whichever is later.

Students who were dismissed may apply for readmission no less than 30 days after their termination date.

Financial Assistance_______________________________

Students may apply for and, if eligible, may receive funds for their education from federally established programs. Programs that The Academy’s Students participate in include the PELL Grant, Stafford, and PLUS student loans. The Academy will help Students applying for public or private financing.

 

Students should contact The Academy’s Financial Aid office for more information, consumer information, applications, and any assistance needed to apply for aid. Eligible Veterans, who wish to receive benefits, must first obtain the School’s Veterans Bulletin that contains policies that supersede those contained in this catalog. A complete directory of consumer information can be found on The Academy’s website: www.arbradio.com.

 

The total cost of the Program is due and payable at the start of classes. Students wishing to finance their education through financial aid or other sources should submit their applications promptly. Methods of payment accepted by The Academy include, cash, check, money orders, and the following credit cards; Visa, MasterCard, Discover, and American Express. If a student obtains a loan to pay for their educational program, the student will have to repay the full amount of the loan plus interest, less the amount of any refund in the case of a student’s withdrawal. If a student received federal student financial aid funds, and withdrew from the institution, the student is entitled to a refund of the money not paid from federal financial aid funds

 

Accommodations made by The Academy for the payment of tuition and fees do not constitute a waiver of rights on the part of The Academy. Students who do not meet their financial obligations to The Academy are subject to dismissal. Unresolved accounts may be turned over for collections and/or litigation and the Student will be responsible for reasonable costs incurred.

The Student Tuition Recovery Fund of California (STRF) applies to you if all of the following are valid: You are a student in an educational program who is a California resident, or are enrolled in a residency program, and prepay all or part of your tuition either by cash, guaranteed student loans, or personal loans, and your total charges are not paid by any third party payer such as an employer, government program or other payer unless you have a separate agreement to repay the third party. You are not eligible for protection from the STRF and you are not required to pay the STRF assessment, if either of the following applies: 1.You are not a California resident, or are not enrolled in a residency program, or 2.Your total charges are paid by a third party, such as an employer, government program or other payer, and you have no separate agreement to repay the third party. The State of California created the Student Tuition Recovery Fund (STRF) to relieve or mitigate economic losses suffered by students in educational programs who are California residents, or are enrolled in a residency programs attending certain schools regulated by the Bureau for Private Postsecondary and Vocational Education. You may be eligible for STRF if you are a California resident or are enrolled in a residency program, prepaid tuition, paid the STRF assessment, and suffered an economic loss as a result of any of the following: 1.The school closed before the course of instruction was completed. 2.The school’s failure to pay refunds or charges on behalf of a student to a third party for license fees or any other purpose, or to provide equipment or materials for which a charge was collected within 180 days before the closure of the school. 3. The school’s failure to pay or reimburse loan proceeds under a federally guaranteed student loan program as required by law or to pay or reimburse proceeds received by the school prior to closure in excess of tuition and other costs. 4. There was a material failure to comply with the Act or this Division within 30 days before the school closed or, if the material failure began earlier than 30 days prior to closure, the period determined by the Bureau. 5. An inability after diligent efforts to prosecute, prove, and collect on a judgment against the institution for a violation of the Act. However, no claim can be paid to any student without a social security number or a taxpayer identification number.

Buyer’s Right to Cancel and Refund Policy__________________

Student may cancel the Agreement and obtain a refund of charges paid through attendance at the first class session, or the seventh day after enrollment, whichever is later. Student may cancel the Agreement on or before the first date of instruction and receive a full refund of all monies paid, less the Application Fee, refunds will be made within 45 days of the Academy’s receipt of written notice. The $100.00 Application Fee which is due and owing at enrollment is nonrefundable. To cancel, Student must deliver in writing, personally, by mail, or telegram, to the Director of The Academy at 16052 Beach Blvd., Suite 263, Huntington Beach, CA 92647, a notice of intent to cancel. Student does not have the right to cancel verbally or by simply not attending. The notice will be effective as of the date of mailing or personal delivery.

A Student has the right to withdraw at any time and, after the commencement of instruction, may be entitled to a partial refund. The amount of any refund will be determined based upon the unexpired part of the program, from the last date of attendance, for which Student has paid. A Student who withdraws after entering into instruction will receive a refund of monies paid based upon the following: If the Student withdraws or is dismissed during the first 60% of the payment period, The Academy will retain a prorated portion of the Tuition covering the Student’s payment period of scheduled attendance, plus the $100.00 Registration Fee, and refund any remainder. Thereafter, The Academy will retain 100% of the Total Cost.

Refunds are made within 45 days of the Academy’s knowledge of withdrawal and paid first to the Student’s funding sources, such as student loans, as a credit to their account. Conversely, Student is obligated to pay, immediately upon withdrawal, any amount owed for scheduled time that was not already paid. Student is responsible for expenses incurred as a result of the collection of the Student’s debt that may include the use of collection agencies and legal action.

Return of Title IV Funds Policy____________________

This Title IV return of federal funds policy operates independently of the Academy of Radio & T.V. Broadcasting institutional refund policy. Because the institution does not provide tuition refunds through 60 percent of an enrollment period, a student who withdraws may owe the Academy for charges no longer covered by returned federal aid.

 

The Higher Education Amendments of 1998 (Sec. 668.22) include provisions governing the return of federal financial assistance for financial aid recipients who completely withdraw from school in any semester. The policy governs all Federal loan and grant programs, including Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loans, Federal Subsidized Stafford Loans, Federal Direct Loans, Federal Perkins Student Loans, PLUS Loans, Federal Pell Grant, and other Title IV programs.

 

In general, the student must “earn” federal financial aid awards directly in proportion to the number of days of the payment period attended. In other words, a student earns financial assistance as they attend class. If a student completely withdraws from all classes during a payment period, the Academy must calculate the portion of the total scheduled financial assistance earned. If the student received (or the Academy received on behalf of the student) more assistance than earned, the unearned excess funds must be returned to the federal programs.

 

The portion of federal loans and grants the student was entitled to earn is calculated on a percentage basis by comparing the total number of calendar days in the payment period to the number of days completed before withdrawal. The calculation for unearned aid is not required for students attending classes over the 60% point of the payment period.

 

The withdrawal date for calculating the Return of Title IV financial assistance will be determined by the Academy as the last date of attendance. The last day of attendance will also be use for a student who fails to return from an approved leave of absence.

 

Unearned federal financial assistance must be returned to program funds up to the amount of assistance that the student has received from the program in the priority order established by regulation: Unsubsidized Stafford Loan, Subsidized Stafford Loan, PLUS Loan, Federal Pell Grant, and other Title IV programs. The Academy takes the responsibility on behalf of the student to return unearned federal financial aid assistance funds that were applied directly to institutional charges. The Academy will reinstate institutional charges no longer covered by financial assistance and the student becomes immediately responsible for the entire outstanding balance. The student is responsible for return of unearned federal financial funds that were disbursed directly to him/her. Funds due for repayment to a loan program permit the student to repay according to the terms of the promissory note. In addition, if the student is directly responsible for repayments of unearned assistance to a federal grant program, only one-half (50%) of the calculated repayment is required. Federal grant money determined to be returned by the student is considered an overpayment. The student must repay that amount in full or make satisfactory repayment arrangements with the U.S. Department of Education. Repayment arrangements must be made by the student within 45 days of the date The Academy notifies the student of the overpayment status. The student is ineligible for future Federal financial assistance if a satisfactory repayment arrangement has not been met.

Staff Biographies__________________________________

 

 

Tom King—President

 

Tom is the co-owner and founder of The Academy. Tom started in radio as an on-air personality and Program Director in Lake Tahoe and then moved to Monterey. After a year there, he started working at KLOK in San Jose and headed on to San Francisco, where he had the top rated Saturday night oldies show on KYA. In 1981, he moved to KUTE in Los Angeles and worked for Gene Autry. He also did air shifts at KNOB in Anaheim and freelanced at KFI in LA. In addition, he co-owned a radio station, KTHO in Lake Tahoe, for 4 years.

 

 

Lindy Thurrell—School Director & Curriculum Specialist

 

She is the co-owner and founder of The Academy. Lindy has over 40 years experience in the Radio/TV industry. The majority of her work was as an on-air radio personality in markets including San Jose, San Francisco and Los Angeles (at KHTZ, KWIZ and KNOB). She has worked many music formats, from easy listening, to classical, to rock. She also did on-camera TV work in several markets, doing commercials and live broadcasts, and her voice over work has been heard in many major markets. In addition, she co-owned a radio station, KTHO in Lake Tahoe, for 4 years.

 

 

Doreen Reyes—Lead Instructor, Radio

 

Her first on-air job was at KRKC, King City in Central California. Within a year, she was voicing 20-30 commercials a week and was the midday news anchor. The next year, she moved to an on-air and Public Service Director position at KWAV in Monterey. After 6 years there, Doreen returned to Southern California to work weekends at KWIZ and was hired at The Academy as a Studio Counselor. A year later she was promoted to Career Director and Music Director for The Academy. Over the past 20 years she has also done voice overs for syndicated shows, and her voice has been heard on numerous stations, including KOST and KLSX in LA, KIRO, Seattle and KTAR, Phoenix.

 

Rick Buttery—Instructor, TV Rick graduated in 1980 from the University of La Verne with a degree in communications. He continued his studies in film and TV at Orange Coast College and Rio Hondo College. He worked for the City of Norwalk’s cable television station (channel 56) for 6 years. Rick was a technical director at the LA County Office of Education TV network for 11 years and helped direct K-12 educational shows. He currently works as a production assistant at the City of Lakewood’s cable TV station (channel 31) and has been there since 1996. He freelances as an instructor for digital boot camp courses for teachers and non-profit organizations. He has been the Television & Video Production instructor at The Academy since 2000.

 

 

Manny Pacheco—Instructor, Radio

 

A Southern California television and radio personality for over three decades, Manny was on NBC’s Santa Barbara, co-hosted the Daytime Emmy-nominated “In Studio” on KCOP, and currently hosts Forgotten Hollywood, a weekly program on the Financial News and Talk Network. Other radio work includes on-air stints on KRLA, KBIG, KKBT, KDAY, and work as a news and traffic reporter on KFI, KLAC, and KTLK. He has enjoyed a growing acclaim through his Forgotten Hollywood Book Series, now included in the library collections of the Hollywood Heritage Museum, Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and American Film Institute. He is currently in production to turn his literary work into a documentary.

 

 

 

Craig Carpenter—Instructor, Radio

 

He has spent his career in and around media in Southern California. He has been an on-air personality at twelve stations, news anchor at one, production director at three, program director at four, sales and marketing at three and did traffic reporting in Los Angeles on over six radio stations and one TV station. He has also been a professional videographer both on land and in the water. He was Creative Director for two boutique advertising agencies and also spent years creating entertainment for the airline industry, flying around the country to interview artists at their homes and then writing, editing, producing and sometimes hosting these specials on airlines ranging from American and United to Air Force One.

 

 

 

 

Tuition_____________________________________________

 

Radio Broadcasting

900 Clock Hours/36 Quarter Credits/7 Months

 

Registration Fee . . . . . . . . . . . .  $100.00

Tuition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,200.00

Total Course Cost……$15,300.00

 

 

Television / Video Production & Broadcasting

900 Clock Hours/36 Quarter Credits/7 Months

 

                                                      Registration Fee . . . . . . . . . . . .  $100.00

Tuition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,200.00

Total Course Cost……$15,300.00

 

Staff_____________________________________________________________________

 

 

TOM KING

President &  Financial Aid Director

 

 

 

LINDY THURRELL

School Director

 

 

 

 

DOREEN REYES

Career Counselor / Chief Instructor-Radio

 

 

RICK BUTTERY

Chief Instructor-Television

 

 

CRAIG CARPENTER

Vocal Coach / Personal Instructor

 

 

 

Campus Location__________________________________

 

The Academy of Radio & TV Broadcasting

 

16052 Beach Blvd., Suite 263

Huntington Beach, CA  92647

Office:  (714) 842-0100

Fax:  (714) 842-1858

www.arbradio.com

 

 

School Performance Factsheet

School Performance Fact Sheet

Calendar Years 2014 & 2015

 

Radio Broadcasting—30 weeks

On-Line Radio Broadcasting—30 weeks

TV/Video Production—30 weeks

 

On Time Completion Rates (Graduation Rates)

Includes data for the two calendar years prior to reporting

Program Calendar Year Number of Students

Who Began the Program

Students Available

For Graduation

Number of On-Time Graduates On-Time

Completion Rate

Radio Broadcasting 2015

2014

24

34

19

20

19

20

79%

64%

 

TV/Video Production 2015

2014

 

7

10

5

9

 

5

9

 

71%

68%

 

Online Radio Broadcasting 2015

2014

 

14

6

9

4

9

4

64%

71%

 

Student Initials__________ Date_______

Initial only after you have had sufficient time to read and understand the information.

Job Placement Rates (includes data for the two calendar years prior to reporting)

Program Calendar Year Number of

Students Who Began Program

Number of Graduates Graduates Available for employment Graduates Employed in the Field Placement Rate % Employed in the Field
Radio Broadcasting 2015

2014

24

33

 

19

26

17

23

12

17

70%

74%

TV/Video Production 2015

2014

7

10

9

15

5

9

3

6

71%

85%

 

Online Radio Broadcasting 2015

2014

 

14

6

4

10

9

4

4

2

66%

50%

You may obtain from the institution a list of the employment positions determined to be in the field for which a student received education and training by contacting the Career Department.

Gainfully Employed Categories

(includes data for the two calendar years prior to reporting)

Part-Time vs. Full-Time Employment

Program Calendar Year Graduates Employed in the Field 20-29 Hrs/Week Graduates Employed in the Field at Least 30 Hrs/Week Total Graduates Employed in the Field
Radio Broadcasting 2015

2014

10

17

2

0

12

17

TV/Video Production 2015

2014

2

6

1

0

3

6

Online Radio Broadcasting 2015

2014

 

3

2

1

0

4

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Single Position vs. Concurrent Aggregated Position

Program Calendar Year Graduates Employed in the Field in a Single Position Graduates Employed in the Field in Concurrent Aggregated Positions Total Graduates Employed in the Field
Radio Broadcasting 2015

2014

12

17

0

0

12

17

TV/Video Production 2015

2014

3

6

0

0

0

3

6

Online Radio Broadcasting 2015

2014

 

4

2

0

0

4

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Self-Employed / Freelance Positions

Program Calendar Year Graduates Employed Who are Self-Employed or Working Freelance Total Graduates Employed in the Field
Radio Broadcasting 2015

2014

9

12

12

17

TV/Video Production 2015

2014

2

4

3

6

Online Radio Broadcasting 2015

2014

 

3

1

4

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Institutional Employment

Program Calendar Year Graduates Employed in the Field who are Employed by the Institution, an Employer Owned by the Institution, or an Employer who Shares Ownership with the Institution Total Graduates Employed in the Field
Radio Broadcasting 2015

2014

0

0

12

17

TV/Video Production 2015

2014

0

0

3

6

Online Radio Broadcasting 2015

2014

 

0

0

4

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Student Initials__________ Date_______

Initial only after you have had sufficient time to read and understand the information.

 

  • This program may result in freelance or self-employment.
  • The work available to graduates of this program is usually for freelance or self-employment.
  • This type of work may not be consistent.
  • The period of employment can range from one day to weeks to several months.
  • Hours worked in a day or week may be more or less than the traditional 8 hour work day or 40 hour work week.
  • You can expect to spend unpaid time expanding your networks, advertising, promoting your services, or honing your skills.
  • Once graduates begin to work freelance or are self-employed, they will be asked to provide documentation that they are employed as such so that they may be counted as placed for our job placement records.
  • Students initialing this disclosure understand that either a majority or all of this school’s graduates are employed in this manner and understand what comprises this work style.

 

Student Initials__________ Date_______

Initial only after you have had sufficient time to read and understand the information.

 

Salary and Wage Information

(includes data for the two calendar years prior to reporting)

Program Calendar Year Graduates Available for employment Graduates Employed in the Field $15,000 to

$20,000

$20,001 to

$25,000

$25,001 to

$30,000

$30,001 to $35,000 Students not Reporting Salary
Radio Broadcasting 2015

2014

 

17

17

 

12

14

        12

14

TV/Video Production 2015

2014

 

5

8

 

3

6

        3

6

 

Radio Broadcasting Online 2015

2014

6

4

 

4

2

        4

2

 

A list of the employers of the graduates Employed in the Field can be obtained from the Career Services Department at the School. Salary information may not have been reported to the School with respect to all of the graduates Employed in the Field.

Student Initials__________ Date_______

Initial only after you have had sufficient time to read and understand the information.

 

Cost of Educational Program

Total charges for the program for students completing on-time in 2015: $15,300. Additional charges may be incurred if the program is not completed on-time.

Student Initials__________ Date_______

Initial only after you have had sufficient time to read and understand the information.

Federal Student Loan Debt

Most recent three year cohort default rate, as reported by the United States Department of Education. * The percentage of enrolled students in 2014 receiving federal student loans to pay for this program The average amount of federal loan debt of 2014 graduates who took out federal student loans at this institution The percentage of graduates in 2014 who took out federal student loans to pay for this program.
7.5% 90% $9500 90%

 

*The percentage of students who defaulted on their federal student loans is called the Cohort Default Rate (CDR). It shows the percentage of this school’s students who were more than 270 days (9 months) behind on their federal student loans within three years of when the first payment was due. This is the most recent CDR reported by the U.S. Department of Education.

Student Initials__________ Date_______

Initial only after you have had sufficient time to read and understand the information.

 

This fact sheet is filed with the Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education. Regardless of any information you may have relating to completion rates, placement rates, starting salaries, or license exam passage rates, this fact sheet contains the information as calculated pursuant to state law.

Any questions a student may have regarding this fact sheet that have not been satisfactorily answered by the institution may be directed to the Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education at 2535 Capitol Oaks Drive, Suite 400, Sacramento, CA 95833, www.bppe.ca.gov, toll-free telephone number (888) 370-7589 or by fax (916) 263-1897.

 

__________________________________

Student Name -Print

___________________________________                                    ____________________________

Student Signature                                                                         Date

 

______________________________________                    ____________________________

School Official                                                                               Date

  • “Number of Students Who Began the Program” means the number of students who began a program who were scheduled to complete the program within 100% of the published program length within the reporting calendar year and excludes all students who cancelled during the cancellation period.
  • “Students Available for Graduation” is the number of students who began the program minus the number of students who have died, been incarcerated, or been called to active military duty.
  • “Number of On-time Graduates” is the number of students who completed the program within 100% of the published program length within the reporting calendar year.
  • “On-time Completion Rate” is the number of on-time graduates divided by the number of students available for graduation.
  • “Graduates Available for Employment” means the number of graduates minus the number of graduates unavailable for employment.
  • “Graduates Unavailable for Employment” means the graduates who, after graduation, die, become incarcerated, are called to active military duty, are international students that leave the United States or do not have a visa allowing employment in the United States, or are continuing their education in an accredited or bureau-approved postsecondary institution.
  • “Graduates Employed in the Field” means graduates who beginning within six months after a student completes the applicable educational program are gainfully employed, whose employment has been reported, and for whom the institution has documented verification of employment.
  • “Placement Rate Employed in the Field” is calculated by dividing the number of graduates gainfully employed in the field by the number of graduates available for employment.
  • “Salary” is as reported by graduate or graduate’s employer.
  • “No Salary Information Reported” is the number of graduates for whom, after making reasonable attempts, the school was not able to obtain salary information.

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